Speakers
Vortragende

  • Serkan
    Arslan

    He leads the business development and ecosystem partner management in Europe for autonomous driving and transportation.
    Arslan brings more than 15 years of international experience in automotive domains including infotainment & cockpit systems, connectivity, ADAS, telematics, and mobility services.
    Prior to joining NVIDIA in 2015, Arslan held a variety of positions with companies including Daimler, Delphi and Grundig.
    He holds bachelor’s degree in Transportation and Logistics, from the University of Heilbronn, in Germany and currently resides in Germany.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Deep Learning - Enabling Self-Driving Cars to See, Think, Act and Learn"

    • It is impossible to write code for every possible scenario as a vehicle navigates
    • In order to develop a truly autonomous car, deep learning and artificial intelligence are required
    • With deep learning, the vehicle can be trained to have super human levels of perception, driving safer than anyone on the road

    ABSTRACT

    New car computing platforms will leverage cameras, radars, lidars and other sensors as well as artificial intelligence for various levels of autonomous driving. Algorithms leveraging structure from motion, sensor fusion and deep learning will help perceive the environment, create HD maps, predict traffic and behavior, and then enable self-driving vehicles to sense, localize and plan a path forward.

    Lecture

    Keynote II: Deep Learning – Enabling Self-Driving Cars to See, Think, Act and Learn

  • Igor
    Doric

    Igor Doric received the diploma in electrical engineering and information technology in 2010. Until June 2012 he was working as a development engineer for the Bosch and Siemens Home Appliances Group. Currently, he is Scientific and Technical Director of CARISSMA, Ingolstadt and PhD candidate in a collaborative research project between Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt, Germany and the University of Warwick, England.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Pedestrian to Vehicle Interaction and the Virtual Test of Active Pedestrian Safety Systems"

    • Measuring Pedestrian to Vehicle Interaction
    • Research on Pedestrian Behavior and Risk Acceptance
    • Virtual Test of Active Pedestrian Safety Systems

    ABSTRACT

    The presentation will show the current status of VISYTE research project, which is focused on the development of a novel pedestrian simulator, leading to an instrument which allows measuring pedestrian to vehicle interaction in a reproducible and safe environment. The measured values can be used for research on pedestrian behavior and risk acceptance. Furthermore, the recorded pedestrian motion pattern are used for a realistic variation of virtual pedestrians during the test of new pedestrian detection algorithms. The project is running from November 2015 to January 2018 and is supported by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (grant number ZF4017401SS5) on the basis of a decision by the German Bundestag.

    Lecture

    Pedestrian to Vehicle Interaction and the Virtual Test of Active Pedestrian Safety Systems

  • Dr. Johann
    Gwehenberger

    Dr. Gwehenberger is Head of Accident Research at the Allianz Centre for Technology. He received a master degree for vehicle mechanics and studied Physics at Munich University of Applied Science. In 1998 he received his doctor degree at Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg on the topic "claim potential of accidents involving tanker trucks carrying dangerous goods."

    He started his career as responsible risk management at DBV- Winterthur Insurance in Munich, especially for motor fleets (1994-1999). From 1999 to June 2004 he was head of the department of truck safety and coordinator for vehicle safety and accident research at GDV Institute for Vehicle Safety. Since July 2004 Dr. Gwehenberger is head of the department "Accident Research" at Allianz Center for Technology.

    Additionally, Dr. Gwehenberger serves as workpackage and task leader in several European Projects relating traffic and vehicle safety. Since 2003 he regularly works as an evaluator and reviewer of European Research Project on behalf of the European Commission. Since 1998 he has a lecture at Munich University of Applied Science and since 2007 at University of Graz relating accident research and technical risk. In 2008 Dr. Gwehenberger was honored with the Joseph-Ströbl-Förderpreis for extraordinary scientific activity in the area of traffic safety.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Current Results Relating the Avoidance Potential and Field Efficiency of Driver Assistance Systems with Increasing Level of Automation"

    ABSTRACT

    Driver assistance systems make a considerable contribution to improving road safety. The accident research department at the Allianz Center for Technology (AZT) has been analyzing their potential through multiple research projects over the past decade (e.g. AKTIV, TRACE, euroFOT), and has made a significant contribution to including effective driver assistance systems in the calculation of insurance premiums in many countries (e.g. AEB).

    Claims submitted to Allianz relating to motor vehicle liability and bodily injury are critically important for evaluating this potential. Several claims databases allow the AZT to carry out prospective and retrospective evaluations, from the minor claims with material damage, up to the most serious bodily injuries, examining them in relation to driver assistance systems for navigation, steering and stabilization. This document contains information as to the potential and use of increasingly-automated driver assistance systems available today and planned for the future. In addition, this work discusses the impact of individual driver assistance systems in connection with car and driver specific factors (e.g. driver age, car class). For example, the efficiency of cars driven mainly in urban environments differs from that of those driven primarily over long distances. Or, the elderly would benefit from different driver assistance systems to young people. Highly Automated functions could have further impact on this area. In this context, first methods of potential and efficiency analysis are discussed.

    Lecture

    Current Results Relating to the Avoidance Potential and Field Efficiency of Driver Assistance Systems with Increasing Level of Automation

  • Dr. Anna
    Nilsson-Ehle

    Since 2006 director at SAFER, research centre with 32 partners. ANE has been 20 years at Volvo, at first with pioneering development of car safety and later several managerial positions within R&D. 1999 she was appointed director of Universeum, the Swedish Science Discovery Centre. ANE is a member of the project office for SIP Drive Sweden and on the program management for DriveMe. She is a member of the Swedish stakeholders collaboration for Vision Zero (GNS), deputy director for China-Sweden Research Centre for Traffic Safety and chair of ReVeRe – Chalmers vehicle research lab for automomous vehicles.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Drive Sweden – A Holistic Approach to Shaping the Future of Mobility"

    • Future mobility will be about sustainable, connected, automated transport solutions
    • Systems thinking and collaboration between all stakeholder is required – and a focus on users
    • Traffic safety will be a key enabling factor for the implementation and trust

    ABSTRACT

    Drive Sweden is a strategic innovation program. An including and open set-up gathers people and organisations from all sectors of society to create activities, research, demos and more. Collaboration and high ambition are central values. Society has high expectations on the automated transport systems ability to contribute to sustainability , including traffic safety . An automated traffic system can be implemented only if proven safe. What is required from research and innovation? How to involve users and stakeholders to understand driving forces and key steps for implementation?

    Lecture

    BEST PRACTICE: Drive Sweden – A Holistic Approach to Shaping the Future of Mobility

  • Dr. Cristina
    Olaverri Monreal

    Dr. Cristina Olaverri Monreal graduated with a Master’s degree in Computational Linguistics, Computer Science and Phonetics from the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) in Munich 2002 and received her PhD 2006 in cooperation with BMW.
    She currently leads the Competence Team “Intelligent Technologies in Smart Cities” at the University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien, Austria. Her research interests lie in multi-functional systems for in-vehicle information and entertainment; overall efficiency of user and system utilization; driver behavior; simulation tools and research concerning Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). Dr. Olaverri is chair of the Technical Activities Committee on Human Factors in ITS. She is Vice-president of Educational Activities in the IEEE ITS Council Executive Committee and a member of the IEEE ITS Board of Governors (BoG). In addition, she serves as an associate editor and editorial board member of several journals in the field, including the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Transactions and the IEEE International Transportation Systems Magazine.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Human Factors in Autonomous Vehicles"

    • Overview of the impact of vehicles automation, on driving performance and safety

    ABSTRACT

    The introduction of autonomous vehicles on our roads represents an opportunity for increased road safety as the automation will make driver intervention in the control of the vehicle unnecessary. Assessment of the driver’s state and the driving environment is essential in promoting road safety in both manual and automatic driving paradigms where the monitoring tasks are either performed by the driver or by the system. This presentation gives an overview of the impact of vehicles automation, on driving performance and safety.

    Lecture

    Human Factors in Autonomous Vehicles

  • Anna
    Schieben

    Anna Schieben received her diploma degree in Psychology at the Technical University of Braunschweig in 2005. Since then, she works at the Institute of Transportation System at DLR, now as Senior Scientist. She is leading a team of six researchers on Human-Machine interaction since 2013. Her main research interests are the development of user-friendly, easy-to-use and safe interaction design for AVs with a specific focus on design for transitions of control between different automation levels and interaction needs of other road users. Anna Schieben was involved as a researcher and WP leader in several national and European projects in this area such as HaveIt, interactIVe, AdaptIVe and CityMobile 1 and 2. To increase the awareness for Human Factors, research needs and user-centric design, she is actively participating in several network activities such as the US-Japan-EU Trilateral working group on Human Factors for AVs, the ERTICO iMobility Forum and the EU CARTRE project and has published more than 20 papers in journals and on conferences in the area of HMI design for AVs.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Highly Automated Vehicles – How Do We Design the Interaction with Other Traffic Participants?"

    • Automated vehicles will significantly change the way traffic participants interact with each other
    • Expectations of other traffic participants need to be taken into account for optimal traffic flow and high societal acceptance
    • First studies on user requirements and HMI solutions available

    ABSTRACT

    There is currently a high desire by manufacturers to introduce Automated Vehicles (AVs), SAE level 3 and above, to the market. As AVs are likely to be deployed in mixed traffic, they need to interact safely and efficiently with other (non-equipped) users, including manually driven vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians. However, compared to human traffic participants these vehicles cannot communicate their intentions to other road users. To ensure intuitive and cooperative interaction between the AV and others, and a smooth flow of all traffic, it is essential that there is good means of communication between all actors. At first, this talk presents which requirements traffic participants have when interacting with AVs in mixed traffic based on the results of the CityMobil2 project and a nationally funded project in Germany. Thereafter, we will focus on potential HMI solutions that support the cooperative behaviour of AVs in mixed traffic and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these solutions. One central issues to be solved in this field is the well-adjusted and timely synchronized control of the HMI elements with the vehicle manoeuvres. The talk closes with an overview of open research questions on the integration of AVs in mixed traffic environments.

    Lecture

    Highly Automated Vehicles – How Do We Design the Interaction with Other Traffic Participants?

  • Stefan
    Schulz

    Stefan Schulz has been in charge of Munich Re’s Motor Consulting Unit (MCU) since 2008 and also heads the new formed Property Consulting Unit (PCU) since 2016.
    Before shaping powerful consulting units, he led the non-life section of one of Munich Re’s strategic primary insurance projects.
    From 2002 to 2006, he was seconded to New Re in Geneva, where he headed the underwriting and marketing unit for France, Benelux, Greece and Cyprus. Prior to this, he was head of the casualty underwriting section responsible for the Nordic Countries, Holland, Israel, Greece and Cyprus, from 1996 to 2002.
    In his career spanning over 35 years at Munich Re, he has assumed a variety of responsibilities and roles in different regions, including Canada, South Africa
    and Australia.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Autonomous Driving and the Impact on Insurances: New Risks, Challenges & Opportunities"

    • Definition: degree of automation & regional differences
    • Advantages/Disadvantages of mobility of the future
    • Impact on the insurances: frequency/claims severity, new/other risks

    Lecture

    Autonomous Driving and the Impact on Insurances: New Risks, Challenges & Opportunities

  • Ursula
    Uttinger, MBA

    Since 1996 engaged with data protection in various functions: data protection officer, data protection auditor, data protection consultant.
    Lecturer and speaker on data protection.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Challenges of Self-Driving Cars – A Legal View with Focus on Data Protection"

    • Self-driving cars & data protection
    • Risks of manipulations
    • Handling of data: environmental data, driver data, data in general

    ABSTRACT

    Self-driving cars deliver new challenges. The risk of hacking has to be solved. Actually it is relatively easy to manipulate the electronics of a car. Manipulation of the car navigation can threaten pedestrians, other drivers or the passengers themselves.
    Another topic is the handling of data: environmental data, driver data or data in general. How long will data be kept? Who has access to the data?

    Lecture

    Challenges of Self-Driving Cars – A Legal View with Focus on Data Protection

  • Prof. Dr. Marieke
    Martens

    Marieke Martens studied experiment psychology and started working at the Traffic Behaviour group at TNO in 1996. Her PhD was about the effect of expectations on visual attention and perception in driving. In 2014, she was appointed professor at the University of Twente in addition to her position at TNO. The main focus of her research is about automation, user interaction and road safety. She firmly believes that the human will remain to play an important role in the safety and acceptance of vehicle automation, both for passenger cars as well as public transport concepts and truck platooning. Transparent automation and seemingly merging with mixed traffic is an approach she follows.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Is the Vehicle Automated or Not? And Does It Really Matter?"

    • Very often, approach is taken to clearly warn other road users for ‘automated vehicles’
    • Automated vehicle should behave according to drivers expectations
    • How to combine ‘driver/passenger’ expectations with expectations of VRUs
    • The presentation will focus on the i-Cave project that started in 2016

    ABSTRACT

    In urban environments, automated driving is a challenge. In the i-Cave project, a cooperative dual model vehicle approach has been chosen, with small electric vehicles bringing passengers and goods around a campus area. The vehicles can be driven manually, can communicate amongst each other (being able to drive without any person inside) but can also drive in automated mode with drivers/passengers. The human factors we consider are dealing with the person inside the vehicle, the HMI but also the way VRUs interact with the vehicles.

    Lecture

    Is the Vehicle Automated or Not? And Does It Really Matter?

  • Klaus
    Rosino

    Klaus Rosino started his career as Project Manager before joining the Austrian Road Safety Board (KFV) in 1997. In 2004 he became executive director of the “KFV Sicherheit-Service GmbH” which he is up till now. In 2015 he established a new innovation department (“smart safety solutions”) within the KFV which he also heads since the start.
    The KFV is a major road safety institution in Austria which was founded in 1959. “smart safety solutions” is the innovation hub of the KFV. It focusses on the development of new, future-oriented solutions for safety and security in a society that is increasingly influenced by trends like digitization and automation.

    LECTURE #1 DETAILS

    "Visions, Fears & Acceptance of Autonomous Driving. The Role of Traffic Safety Focused on Mixed Traffic"

    • New potential and challenges for traffic safety
    • Public acceptance
    • Evaluating critical mixed traffic scenarios

    ABSTRACT

    As research into innovative forms of automated vehicles gains momentum, it is important that we develop an understanding of the factors that will impact the adoption of these systems. While so far much attention has been paid on technological aspects of automated vehicles, human factors and the interaction of all traffic users in new mixed traffic situations are currently not sufficiently covered. Exploiting the safety potential of technologies that are about to be introduced will both, require action on a technological level on the one hand and involve society as a whole on the other. Communication, not just in a technological sense (V2V, V2X) but actual communication with users (“Vehicle to human” – “V2H”), seems crucial to pave the ground for a successful introduction of automated vehicles.

    LECTURE #2 DETAILS

    "The Traffic Safety Perspective: How to Ensure Safe Implementation of Automated and Connected Driving?"

    • The crucial topics discussed during the Breakout Sessions
    • How did we come to this conclusions?
    • Central demands for safe implementation of automated and connected driving

    with SANDRA ULRICH, Innovation Manager at smart safety solutions, Austrian Road Safety Board

    ABSTRACT

    The topics discussed in the Breakout Sessions are considered the crucial topics for traffic safety. The input from the break-out sessions will result in a position paper with the central demands for safe implementation of automated and connected driving. These results will be presented.

    Lecture

    LECTURE: Visions, Fears & Acceptance of Autonomous Driving. The Role of Traffic Safety in the System of Mixed Traffic

    The Traffic Safety Perspective: How to Ensure Safe Implementation of Automated and Connected Driving?

  • Sandra
    Ulrich

    Sandra Ulrich works as an innovation manager for smart safety solutions in the Austrian Road Safety Board. The main purpose of the company is to prevent, reduce or mitigate motor vehicle crashes and their attendant deaths and injuries. The focus of her work are the impact of automated vehicles on traffic safety and their interaction with the various road users.

    Before that, she worked several years for Strabag SE on international infrastructure projects throughout Europe and South America as team leader for road operation and maintenance in the department of project development. Ms. Ulrich studied construction management and engineering at the university of applied sciences Joanneum Graz and the university of South Australia. She started her career working as construction designer in a tunnel design firm in Washington D.C. and after that worked as design coordinator for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in Takasago, Japan.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "The Traffic Safety Perspective: How to Ensure Safe Implementation of Automated and Connected Driving?"

    • The crucial topics discussed during the Breakout Sessions
    • How did we come to the conclusions?
    • Central demands for safe implementation of automated and connected driving

    with KLAUS ROSINO, Head of smart safety solutions, Austrian Road Safety Board

    ABSTRACT

    The topics discussed in the Breakout Sessions are considered the crucial topics for traffic safety. The input from the break-out sessions will result in a position paper with the central demands for safe implementation of automated and connected driving. These results will be presented.

    Lecture

    LECTURE: Visions, Fears & Acceptance of Autonomous Driving. The Role of Traffic Safety in the System of Mixed Traffic

  • Prof. Dr. Natasha
    Merat

    Professor Merat is an experimental psychologist and research group leader of the Human Factors and Safety Group, Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds. Her main research interests involve understanding the interaction of road users with new technologies. She applies this interest to studying factors such as driver distraction and driver impairment, and she is an expert in studying the human factors implications of highly automated vehicles. She is currently involved in two main European Projects on automated vehicles. In the AdaptIVe project, she is studying drivers’ ability to resume control from automation in critical situations and investigating how this transition is achieved quickly and safely. For CityMobil2, Dr. Merat is investigating pedestrians’ perceptions and views of fully automated low speed vehicles, which are currently under demonstration in a number of European Cities. Dr. Merat is Chair of the TRB sub-committee on Human Factors in Road Vehicle Automation, and has appointments as expert advisor to the European Commission, AutoLiv Inc and the UK Department for Transport Committee on Connected and Automated Transport. She has also been guest editor of two journal publications in recent years (Human Factors Journal 2012, and Transportation Research Part F, 2012), bringing together the latest results of studies from around the globe on how vehicle automation may affect driver.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "What Information Do Pedestrians and Cyclists Require from Urban Fully Automated Vehicles? Some Results from the CityMobil2 Project"

    ABSTRACT

    This paper will report on results from a questionnaire study administered to pedestrians and cyclists, during live trials of a number of Automated Road Transport Systems (ARTS) in Europe. Conducted as part of the CityMobil2 project, and funded by the European Commission, the short questionnaire was administered to 664 participants in the cities of La Rochelle in France, Lausanne, Switzerland and Trikala, Greece during 2015. The questionnaire was then supplemented by two focus group discussions with the citizens of La Rochelle, around a month after the end of the vehicle trials. Although there has been much advancement in recent years to progress the technologies associated with realising such fully driverless vehicles, operating at SAE Level 4, there is currently very little research on understanding the needs of those outside these vehicles, who are likely to interact with them in a shared space environment. Since such ARTS are not controlled by a driver, there is no obvious means of communication between them and other road users. However, their ultimate deployment and acceptance by road users would likely rely on the vehicle’s ability to effectively communicate information regarding its movement and trajectory, to those in its immediate vicinity, in order to avoid conflict or stalemate situations, which have already been observed during trials. One main aim of the survey was, therefore, to seek participants’ opinion about their interactions with these vehicles and gauge their thoughts on the type and nature of messages and communications strategies needed when interacting with ARTS in the same shared space. Participants were also asked to report how safe they felt sharing space with the ARTS and expressed their thoughts on whether or not they had priority over the ARTS under different infrastructure settings. Results showed very similar feedback from the respondents of the three cities and will be discussed with respect to the design of new Human Machine Interfaces positioned on the exterior body of such vehicles to aide safe interaction with VRUs.

    Lecture

    LECTURE: What Information Do Pedestrians and Cyclists Require from Urban Fully Automated Vehicles? Some Results from the CityMobil2 Project

  • Assoc. Prof. Dr. Arno
    Eichberger

    Born 1969, he studied Mechanical Engineering at the University of Technology Graz, where he graduated in 1995. He received a doctor’s degree in technical sciences in 1998 with distinction. From 1998 to 2007 Arno Eichberger was employed at MAGNA STEYR Fahrzeugtechnik AG&Co and dealt with different aspects of active and passive safety. Since 2007, Arno Eichberger is working at the Institute of Automotive Engineering (University of Technology Graz) dealing with Driver Assistance Systems, Vehicle Dynamics and Suspensions. Since 2012 he is Associate Professor holding a venia docendi in Automotive Engineering.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    "Evaluation of Acceptance, Safety and Trust of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems with Respect to Influences of Age, Gender and Road Conditions"

    • Experimental driver simulator study with 96 volunteer drivers
    • Evaluation of Adaptive Cruise Control and Autonomous Emergency Braking
    • Systematic investigation of driver preferences with respect to age, gender and road condition

    ABSTRACT

    Automation of driving is one of the mega trends in the automotive industry. The reasons are increase in road safety, comfort, fuel reduction and added values for new electronic components.

    Following experiences of the past, it is expected that higher automation will be introduced by adding higher automation functions, aiming at full automation. Nevertheless, for the next future a complex interaction between the human driver acting as an operator and the automated vehicle is foreseen and one of the key issues in automation of driving.

    Lecture

    Evaluation of Acceptance, Safety and Trust of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems with Respect to Influences of Age, Gender and Road Conditions

  • Alexander
    Mankowsky

    Born in Berlin in 1957, Alexander Mankowsky studied Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology at the Free University of Berlin. He graduated in 1984 with the title of Diplom Soziologe.
    After four years in social services helping troubled children, he decided to follow the Zeitgeist and enrolled at a post graduate university, focusing on the then new field of Artificial Intelligence. After heavy programming in OOS and Prolog, he earned himself the title of ‘Knowledge Engineer’. Since 1989 Alexander Mankowsky has worked in the research unit at Daimler AG, initially focusing on societal trends in mobility. This led him in 2001 to his current field of work – ‘Future, Human &Technology’.
    Alexander Mankowsky is focused on human centered innovation utilizing futuristic technological concepts. He is embedded in Daimler’s rich and diverse network of creatives.

    Lecture

    Keynote III: Informed Trust: A Concept to Introduce Safety and Playfulness into Traffic, Utilizing Autonomous Cars

    PANEL DISCUSSION: Are We Ready for the Rapid Technological Development of Autonomous Vehicles?

  • Dr. Walter
    Aigner

    Dr. Walter Aigner is co-founder and managing director of HiTec. He holds a PhD in Innovation Management, has more than 20 years of research experience at University level and joint industry research projects level. He was involved in authoring evaluation methodology design for EU-SPIRIT, led HiTec's market forecast and sensitivity analysis on GALILEO in VAST and participated in coordinating national accompanying measures on SATNAV in GNSS-Austria and ARTIST (Austrian Radio Navigation Testbed); He led HiTec's research activities in three EC IPs (LIAISON, Charpan, COOPERS) and 13 STREPs and support actions. Walter co-authored AAL’s first work-program (joint European initiative on ITS for elderly) and evaluated transport-related cost/benefit studies for DG MOVE and recently published a book chapter on ITS-evaluation policy. His research focuses on the role of key individuals in innovation processes and women pioneering in adopting low-carbon mobility.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    “Wien ZWA – Viennese Mobility Lab for Automated Driving in Mixed Traffic"

    • Independent mobility lab
    • Dynamic anticipation
    • Open innovation approach

    ABSTRACT

    Vienna metropolitan region hosts an independent real-world living lab on sustainable automated driving. Global state-of-the-art is tested in a real-world mixed-traffic testbed from the airport to the city centre conference arena. Focus is on dynamic interaction between pedestrians, two-wheelers and autonomous cars. The test track includes traffic lights as well as a significant element of the European C-ITS corridor from Rotterdam to Vienna. Momentum is added by the highly visible events accompanying Austrian presidency in EU-Council 2018 and Transport Research Arena 2018. This is being set up as a truly independent lab open to all putting humans back in the loop.

    Lecture

    “Wien ZWA” – Viennese Mobility Lab for Automated Driving in Mixed Traffic

  • Dr. Wolfgang
    Schildorfer

    Dr. Wolfgang Schildorfer holds a PhD in Innovation Marketing. He started his career in service development, with Austria’s largest telecommunications provider. After that he set-up and led a company for the usage of new business models in Marketing for Telecom- and Internet-services. He led his own promotion agency specialising in internet advertising and integrated communication. Since 2007 in HiTec Wolfgang has elaborated roll-out strategies and business models for strategic EC projects (eMOTION, COOPERS and 2DECIDE). He led a feasibility study on Saxony-Anhalt’s Galileo testbed and is on the management team of Austria’s cooperative service testbed “Testfeld Telematik” and the corridor project “ECo-AT”. He has been project coordinator of the urban mobility lab “WienZWA – Zukuft Wird Anders”. Currently he coordinates the lab on autonomous driving “WienZWA – Zukunft Wird Automatisiert”. He is teaching innovation marketing at three Austrian Universities and is evaluator for national and European research projects and programmes.

    LECTURE DETAILS

    “Wien ZWA – Viennese Mobility Lab for Automated Driving in Mixed Traffic"

    • Independent mobility lab
    • Dynamic anticipation
    • Open innovation approach

    ABSTRACT

    Vienna metropolitan region hosts an independent real-world living lab on sustainable automated driving. Global state-of-the-art is tested in a real-world mixed-traffic testbed from the airport to the city centre conference arena. Focus is on dynamic interaction between pedestrians, two-wheelers and autonomous cars. The test track includes traffic lights as well as a significant element of the European C-ITS corridor from Rotterdam to Vienna. Momentum is added by the highly visible events accompanying Austrian presidency in EU-Council 2018 and Transport Research Arena 2018. This is being set up as a truly independent lab open to all putting humans back in the loop.

    Lecture

    “Wien ZWA” – Viennese Mobility Lab for Automated Driving in Mixed Traffic

  • Dr. Othmar
    Thann

    Born on 10.10.1956 in Schwanenstadt, Upper Austria.
    Studies of Philosophy and German philology as well as law at the University of Vienna. Legal practice, afterwards 13 years work experience at the Federal Ministry of public Economy and Transport as Deputy of the section and group leader in the area of road traffic. Since 1999 General Manager of Austrian Road Safety Board. Member of the golden badge for merit of the Austrian Republic.

    Lecture

    Opening speech by the Austrian Road Safety Board

    PANEL DISCUSSION: Are We Ready for the Rapid Technological Development of Autonomous Vehicles?

  • Michael
    Nikowitz, MSc

    Michael Nikowitz holds a Master of Science in Engineering in Mechatronics and Robotics from the University of Applied Sciences – Technikum Vienna.
    For several years he worked in the automotive industry as a Robotics Engineer as well as a Laser Scientist specialising on ultrashort pulse laser systems. Michael also worked at the Austrian Association for Advanced Propulsion Systems in the field of alternative drive trains and their energy carriers representing Austria at the International Energy Agency and developing roadmaps for eco-mobility and automated driving.
    Since November 2016 he is tasked with the coordination and strategic development of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Transport’s initiatives in automated driving in the General Secretary’s Office. Michael has published several papers on the successful implementation of xEVs as well as a book on “System Optimization and Vehicle Integration of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles”, in cooperation with the Springer group. His latest book on “Fully Autonomous Vehicles” provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of the art of driverless cars.

    Lecture

    Towards a Comprehensive Public Perspective on Automated Driving: Current Developments in Austria

  • Sabine
    Kühschelm

    Sabine Kühschelm is Head of the Group Infrastructure Procedures and Road Safety in the Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology in Austria. As the Head of the Workgroup Test Infrastructures and Legal Frameworks she contributed significantly to the Austrian Action Plan „Automated Driving“, launched in June 2016 by the Federal Minister Jörg Leichtfried.

    After completing her Law Studies she worked at various Law Firms and later on as Advisor for Road Safety, Road Traffic Law and Public Transport for the Federal Minister for Transport Innovation ans Technology.

    Lecture

    PANEL DISCUSSION: Are We Ready for the Rapid Technological Development of Autonomous Vehicles?

  • Gerhard
    Menzel

    Gerhard Menzel is working as policy officer at the European Commission, DG Mobility and Transport within Unit B.4 - Sustainable & Intelligent Transport. He chairs the working group on Security and Standardisation within the Commission's Platform for the deployment of C-ITS. Further he is among the policy officers in charge of the Commission's recent Communication on the EU deployment strategy of cooperative, connected and automated mobility. He holds a Master of Science in Engineering in Intelligent Transport Systems from the University Linköping (Sweden) and University of Applied Sciences Vienna (Austria). Prior to joining the European Commission he worked several years as expert in the field of ITS Deployment at AustriaTech – an agency of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Transport.

    Lecture

    Keynote I: Cooperative, Connected and Automated Mobility: The European Context

    PANEL DISCUSSION: Are We Ready for the Rapid Technological Development of Autonomous Vehicles?

  • Martin
    Russ

    Martin Russ became Managing Director of AustriaTech in 2011.
    AustriaTech is the “Mobility Agency” of the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation & Technology and it follows a long-term strategy towards sustainable transport– and mobility services and solutions, like Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) and e-mobility.
    The federal company works in partnership with Austrian infrastructure operators, mobility service providers, and industry, as well as research facilities and public authorities.

    Martin Russ studied Regional and Transportation Planning at Vienna Technical University.
    As a consultant and transport engineer he gained broad experience in transportation and mobility planning and mobility technology.
    From 2005 to 2008 he was responsible for the Austrian Transport Technology Research Program at the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG).
    Between 2008 and 2011 he was senior advisor for innovation and technology at the cabinet of the Minister of Transport and Innovation and Technology.
    In addition he acts a general secretary of ITS Austria (the national multimodal mobility platform), is a member of the coordinating committee of European ITS Nationals.
    He is a member of the Supervisory Board of ERTICO – ITS Europe.

    Lecture

    PANEL DISCUSSION: Are We Ready for the Rapid Technological Development of Autonomous Vehicles?

  • Karin
    Fest

    Karin Fest works as an innovation manager for smart safety solutions in the Austrian Road Safety Board. The main purpose of the company is to prevent, reduce or mitigate motor vehicle crashes and their attendant deaths and injuries. The focus of her work are the impact of automated vehicles on traffic safety and their interaction with the various road users.
    Ms. Fest studied media and cultural sciences and is currently pursuing a degree in entrepreneurship and innovation management. Before that, she worked as a research associate and a project manager, researching and teaching on topics related to media techniques, urban practices and media communication.

    Lecture

    The Traffic Safety Perspective: How to Ensure Safe Implementation of Automated and Connected Driving?

  • Daniela
    Patz

    Daniela Patz works as an innovation manager for smart safety solutions in the Austrian Road Safety Board. The main purpose of the company is to prevent, reduce or mitigate motor vehicle crashes and their attendant deaths and injuries. The focus of her work are the impact of automated vehicles on traffic safety and their interaction with the various road users.
    Before that, she worked as a project manager and lecturer at the Faculty of Social Science in Vienna and as a Junior Producer responsible for the implementation of numerous media and cultural projects. Ms. Patz studied Social- and Cultural Anthropology at the universities of Vienna and Copenhagen.

    Lecture

    The Traffic Safety Perspective: How to Ensure Safe Implementation of Automated and Connected Driving?

  • Federal Minister Jörg
    Leichtfried

    Federal Minister Jörg Leichtfried

    Lecture

    Welcome & Video Message by Federal Minister Jörg Leichtfried

  • Stefan
    Perkmann Berger

    Dr. Stefan Perkmann Berger is the founder and Managing Director of WhatAVenture. Together with his team he supported more than 2000 startups and 250 corporate innovation teams guiding their business ideas into success. His expertise in building lean innovation processes helps leading corporates to successfully establish their own innovation management teams.

    He has a strong research background in the field of open innovation and lectures innovation management and entrepreneurship at Vienna University of economics and business, FHWien- University of Applied Sciences and is a Jury member at the Austrian state award for digital solutions in 2017.

    Lecture

    Moderation

  • Martin
    Szelgrad

    Martin Szelgrad is editor-in-chief of the Austria-based business magazines „Telekom & IT Report“ and „Energie Report“. He is author of the magazine „Report (+) Plus“ and he has the managing lead oft the IT business plattform „eAward“. He also has hosted and moderated discussions, business talks and events on a regular basis since 2005.

    Lecture

    Moderation